Author Archives: bankelele

About bankelele

Writing on banking, finance and investments in East Africa. Email bankelele_at_hotmail.com, Instagram: Bankelele, Twitter: @Bankelele.

Media Moment: Kenya Landscape Report

This morning a, joint report by TIFA Research and Reelforge Media Intelligence was released about the media landscape in Kenya.

Excerpts from the report

  • Advertising remains a key source of revenue of media. Also the media, while still powerful faces many challenges including global competition for advertisers (Facebook and Google), and for consumers from other digital platforms.
  • Audiences are fragmented, with people interacting with five radio and 3 TV stations every day. TIFA has tried to improve on the traditional data collecting methods for audience measurement by using an app in the phones of test subjects.
  • For brands, Facebook is the most effective – used by 71% of corporations to reach audiences, followed by Twitter 26%. Least used are podcasts, email and surprisingly WhatsApp – despite its prevalence (all below 2%).
  • Social media and content marketing are the most effective ways of reaching consumers, according to the report. The least effective methods are email campaigns, public relations and outdoors advertising (all below 8%).
  • Whatsapp and Facebook are the most popular platforms with internet audiences – used by over 80% of the respondents – and this is largely because they are free from Telecom providers.
  • The top media spender in 2019 is projected to be Safaricom with Kshs 9.7 billion. In 2018 it was gambling company Tatua which spent Kshs 5.3 billion. In 2017 it was the Government of Kenya which spent Kshs 8.6 billion in that was an election year. Spending by gambling companies has been on the rise with half of the top advertising companies now being betting firms.
  • Radio remains attractive because it is free for audiences access. It also had the has the highest advertising over the period – mainly by political parties during the  2017 Kenya elections.
  • Newspaper circulation continued to decline, and the authors estimated at circulation went down by 33% between 2013 and 2018.
  • Digital migration has increased the reach of TV. Today, Kenya has 173 radio stations, 68 TV stations and 9 newspapers. 

The report by TIFA and Reelforge is now available for download.

Africa: Sports as a Business and a Brand

At the ongoing Africa Cup of Nations in Egypt, the visual imagery of almost-empty stadiums is a powerful narrative. But not the kind that African sports, African football, or corporate sponsors deserve.

The empty seat syndrome suggests that football fans are voting with their feet, or better still with their backsides. Fans are choosing not to watch live football events, and instead are opting in increasing numbers for the ‘intimacy’ of their crystal clear digital flat TV screens, or not all.

Before Egypt’s stunning 0-1 loss to South Africa in the round of 16, the host country was the only team able to attract 70,000 fans. Other than when Mo Salah and the Pharaohs have been on the field, most stadia across Egypt have at best attracted an average of 5,000 to 7,000 fans.

Official broadcast camera crews have done a creative job minimizing the visual gaps of empty seats. But wide camera angles reveal the obvious … a lack of attendance and public enthusiasm, in spite of the presence of some of the biggest names in world football on the field.

In European football leagues, where many of the stars in Egypt ply their trade, fans pay mega bucks to see the likes of John Mikel Obi, Ahmed Musa, Sadio Mane, Ryahd Mahrez, Nicolas Pépé, Wilfred, Zaha, and Kalidou Koulibaly.

Which is why the empty seats in Egypt are both stunning.

Admittedly, Egypt bailed CAF out and should receive well-deserved credit for coming to the rescue and hosting the African Cup of Nations, with barely 6 months notice, when the original hosts were sanctioned due to shoddy preparations.

Nevertheless, the lack of attendance in Egypt speaks volumes high ticket costs; the timing of matches bang in the middle of work days; the difficulties faced by national team supporters in obtaining entry visas to Egypt; and challenges with the Confederation of African Football’s complicated online ticket purchasing system.

It should not be so. This after all, is the most important event in Africa’s sports calendar. At least, it used to be before England’s Premier League, Spain’s La Liga, Italy’s Serie A, and Germany’s Bundesliga captured our collective imaginations.

The end result is that where once 30,000 to 70,000 fans a week watched highly competitive domestic football leagues across Africa, the empty seat syndrome has been the norm for almost two decades. It is not unusual to have less than a thousand fans in a stadium that seats 30,000.

The lack of fan attendance has obvious economic and financial implications across the sports value chain for team owners, sports federations and confederations, players, sponsors, advertising and marketing agencies, merchandisers, vendors, and local communities who once counted on fan attendance to boost fledgling economies.

What’s responsible for the increasing slide in fan attendance?

1. Poor facilities
2. High ticket costs
3. A lack of reliable transportation to and from venues. As well as sufficient and secure parking.
4. Increasingly crude behaviour and violence at event locations.
5. Technology. Mobile phones and Apps that carry events live as well as a plethora of entertainment alternatives. In other words, once big events are no longer the main gigs in town.

So, what can be done to reverse the trend? Here are 5 quick suggestions.

1. It can no longer be business as usual. Africa must run sports as a professional business. This includes the right infrastructure, training facilities, attractive pay scales for professional athletes who now consider anything less than a European league appearance, a professional failure.

Regrettably, as with Africa’s overall propensity to simply export raw materials instead of adding value to what we produce, we are doing the same with football and many other sports. Africa has a tremendous abundance of potential talent that for the most part (with the exception of South Africa, Kenya and Ethiopia) we add little or no value to. Instead, millions of genetically blessed athletes are simply waiting or begging to be ‘found’ on the cheap by European and American sports teams. Why? Simply because we fail to see diamonds in the rough and because we are unable to add value to the potential of what for now seems to be rough stones.

2. Modern and professionally maintained facilities: In sizzling hot Africa, we must invest in covered stadia. When I can sit in front of my big screen TV in my air-conditioned living room, why would I want to subject myself to temperatures that I swear have gone up a number of notches in recent years?

3. Sport is a spectacle. This includes everything including pre-event and half time entertainment to keep fans with short attention spans upbeat and engaged.

4. Give back to the fans: Essentially, engagement in the 21st century must change. It’s time to give something back to fans rather than fleecing them at every opportunity with sub-standard services and products. It would seem to me that sports teams could offer something as simple as raffle draws that reward fans with extra game tickets, signed player jerseys, visits with select players, or products from local sponsors. Professional marketing firms can come up with an endless list.

5. Make sports big and make it a win-win proposition:  Real Madrid F.C. and Barcelona F.C. for example, are not owned by a few rich individuals. Instead, they are owned and supported by thousands of shareholders known as ‘socios.’ Across Africa, it’s time to change the numbers game – in ownership, money, and attendance – by giving fans a seat at the table.

These are just a few quick ideas. However, the running of sports in general and football in particular as a business and a brand proposition, will require honest analysis, political and financial will, and a collective approach.

It must be if Africa is to unlock its sports potential and turn millions into billions.

Dr. Victor Oladokun, is the Director of Communication and External Relations at the African Development Bank

Kenya launches futures derivatives markets

The Nairobi Securities Exchange (NSE) has gone live with NEXT – futures derivatives trading in a move to enhance risk management and becoming the second exchange in Africa to offer exchange-traded derivatives.

The NSE will offer two types of derivatives; equity single stock futures (SSF) starting with shares of five listed firms that met specific criteria such as high daily trading volumes (British American Tobacco, East Africa Breweries, Equity Group Holdings, Kenya Commercial Bank Group, and Safaricom Plc) as well as an NSE 25 Share Index futures (EIF) that provides investors with a benchmark to track the performance of the Kenyan securities market. The introduction of NEXT futures will also increase trading activity and liquidity at the NSE as investors will have the potential for greater returns, even when share prices are going down (short selling), as they only have to put up a small amount of money as leverage.

This comes after a successful six-month pilot test in which end-to-end derivative transactions were done in a live environment, and which tested the capabilities of market players. Kenya’s Capital Markets Authority (CMA) then granted approval in May 2019 for the NSE to launch and operate the derivatives exchange market.

The CMA has also licensed several entities to undertake derivative services.  The stockbrokers that will offer derivatives futures to investors from today will be African Alliance Securities, AIB Capital, Apex Africa Capital, CBA Capital, Dyer & Blair Investment Bank, Faida Investment Bank, Genghis Capital, Kestrel Capital,  Kingdom Securities, NIC Securities, SBG Securities, Standard Investment Bank and Sterling Capital. Also, two banks, Stanbic and Cooperative, will provide clearing and settlement services, collecting margins and generating data and reports on futures trading activities.

The launch of NEXT derivatives trading comes after a series of other innovations at the NSE including the introductions of the M-Akiba mobile phone bond, Real Estate Investment Trusts (REIT’s), asset-backed securities and exchange traded funds (ETF’s). If the uptake and performance of stock futures are successful, next at the NSE will be currency derivatives and interest rate derivatives.

Coca-Cola Innovation Push

Coca-Cola today launched “Coke plus Coffee”, a coffee-flavoured beverage that is one of five new products that the company is introducing in Kenya to match new and changing consumer tastes and spending habits. 

Also unveiled was “Minute Maid Nutridefenses” in five different fruit flavours, “Sprite” and “Fanta” without sugar, “Fuze” tea bags, and “Powerade”, a rehydration drink for sports users that will feature at the Olympic Games.

At the launch, Company representatives said that the developments were guided by their research to come up with new products and to deliver choice and convenience to customers by providing quality products – dubbed  “the right refreshment, in the right package, at the right price.”

Aside from the new beverages for coffee lovers, juice lovers and sports people, Coca-Cola is also moving to reduce its plastic footprint by shifting the distribution of Dasani water to glass, returnable bottles that are sold at more affordable prices. This is alongside a wider push to accelerate the collection and recycling of plastic bottles and reduce waste pollution in East and Southern Africa.

Aside from this Coca-Cola is in the process of completing a deal with Centum Investments to take control of beverage bottling companies in Eldoret and Nyeri (through Almasi) as well as Nairobi Bottlers.

Airtel Africa – London prospectus peek

By the end of the week Airtel Africa will have a dual listing at the London Stock Exchange with a secondary one in Lagos after raising $750 million, by offering new shares to investors at 80 pence per share in June 2019, and valuing the company at £3.1 billion (~$3.9 billion).

The goal of the listing was to reduce the debt of the company further after it had earlier raised $1.25 billion from six global investors including Softbank, Warburg Pincus and Temasek in October 2018.

A peek at the 380-page prospectus and other listing documents:

About Airtel Africa: As at 31 December 2018, the Group was the second largest mobile operator in Africa, by the number of active subscribers(according to Ovum); they had 99 million mobile voice customer and 30 million mobile data one and 14.2 million mobile money customers.

Performance: For the financial year 2019 they had $3.01 billion revenue with 1.1 billion from Eastern Africa, $1.1 billion from Nigeria and $900 million from the rest of Africa. Of the total revenue, $2.9 billion was from mobile services with $167m from mobile money. Eastern Africa is Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Tanzania, Malawi and Zambia, and the rest of Africa comprises operations in Niger, Gabon, Chad, Congo, DRC, Madagascar and Seychelles. The company had a pre-tax profit of $272 million compared to a loss before tax of $9 million in 2018.

Managers & Employees: The Company has ten non-executive directors (including the Chairman). Also, Raghunath Mandava and Jaideep Paul will serve as chief executive officer and chief financial officer of the Group from their operational head office for Africa based in Nairobi. They will be enrolled in a company long-term incentive (share option) plan along with other executives of the Group.

Shareholders: Prior to the listing, top shareholders were AAML – a subsidiary of Bharti Airtel (68.31%), Warburg Pincus (7.65%) Singapore Telecom (Singtel 5.46%), ICIL – a Bharti Mittal family group (5.46%),  Hero (owned by Sunil Kant Munjal – 4.37%) and the Qatar Investment Authority (QIA) with 4.37%.

After the listing, in which the company will have sold between 14% and 18.9%%, the top shareholders will be AAML (56.12%), Warburg Pincus (6.28%) Singtel (4.49%), ICIL (4.49%),  Hero (3.59%) and QIA with 3.59%).  Also, subject to completion of a merger deal in Kenya, Telkom Kenya may acquire up to 4.99% if they exercise a flip-up right.

Other: 

  • Results for the (London) global and Nigeria uptake were announced on 28 June, and share accounts of new investors will be credited from July 3 and listed in London that day, and in Nigeria on July 4. 
  • Like other telco’s in Africa, 96% of their customers are prepaid. ARPU was $2.72 per user in 2019, down from $3 in 2018 and $3.24 in 2017.
  • Airtel has two distinct strategies; where they are market leaders (e.g in Chad), they price closely to market rates and where they are seeking market leadership (e.g in Kenya), they prioritize affordability.
  • Other Financing: In May 2019, the Company arranged for a “New Airtel Africa Facility” bank facility with Standard Chartered.
  • Other Deals: Ongoing settlement discussions in Tanzania, one over a tax claim, will see all cases withdrawn and boost the Government’s shareholding to 49% at no cost. In Kenya, they are merging with Telkom Kenya and in Rwanda, they are acquiring Tigo.
  • Listing Fees: The company will pay the fees and expenses for the listing totalling $35 million for the UK admission – and these include FCA fees, bank’ commissions, professional fees, costs of printing and distribution of documents.  The joint global co-ordinators and joint bookrunners were  J.P. Morgan Cazenove and Citigroup, joint bookrunners were Absa, Barclays, BNP Paribas, Goldman Sachs, HSBC, Standard Bank, the Nigerian joint issuing houses were Barclays Securities Nigeria and  Quantum Zenith Capital, while the public relations advisor was Kekst CNC.

About Airtel in Kenya:

  • Airtel is the second-largest telco in Kenya with 13.1 million subscribers and market share of 28%.
  • Telkom Kenya is expected to acquire a shareholding of 32% in Airtel Kenya in an ongoing business transfer deal. 
  • The company is working with Kenya’s Central Bank to reverse a negative (Kshs -2.7 billion) capital position as a requirement to be part of the national payment system. They expected to lose another Kshs 1.2 billion this year.
  • Airtel has proposed to separate the mobile money business from the telecommunication one and fund the new one with shareholder loans. They had committed to recapitalize the company by Kshs 3.85 billion ($38 million) by August 2019.