E.A. Power & Lighting, 1929

The financial results of the East Africa Power & Lighting Company were published in London in July 1930 and reported by the East African Standard in Nairobi later that month.

Excerpts:

  • Revenue from sales for the year after generation costs was £86,891. Other revenue was £1,334 from the meter department.
  • Repairs, maintenance and distribution cost £11,964, salaries were £11,649, while directors fees and head offices expenses were £5,265, leaving a balance on the revenue account of £65,044.
  • The authorized share capital of the company was £700,000 with £570,000 issued, of which £270,000 are (7%) preference shareholders. Capital expenditure of the company was £432,462, with investments of £50,000.
  • The profit carried forward of Shgs 1,334,797 (equivalent to £66,739/17) was allocated as a dividend of Shgs 378,000 to the preference shareholders, depreciation was Shgs 220,000, to the general reserve was Shgs 60,000, re-issue of capital of Shgs 120,000 and a reduction of capital expenditure of Shgs 45,857.
  • This left a balance of Shgs 330,940 out of which a final dividend of 4% (making a total of 7% for the year) would be paid, and the staff provident fund would get Shgs 60,000, while Shgs 30,490 would be carried forward.
  • The company was negotiating with the Government for permission to develop further hydro-electric resources. The Financial Times described the discussions as “progressive” and that a favourable decision would soon be reached to hasten the execution of the work. They were also considering an additional plant in the Mombasa area to meet the increasing demand.
  • The number of consumers in Nairobi in 1929 was 3,084, an increase from 2,292 in 1927, while Mombasa had 1,424 consumers, an increase from 994 in 1927.
  • Owing to his absence from the Colony, Mr. J. Cumming, who joined the board in 1928, resigned his position as a director. The Hon. D. Finch Hatton was re-elected, while Mr. R. G. Vernon of Nairobi was appointed to fill a temporary vacancy on the board.

More:

  • From KPLC: In 1922, two utilities in Nairobi and Mombasa merged under a new company incorporated as the East African Power and Lighting Company (EAP&L).
  • See a more detailed story on the history of the company and a recent one on investing.

Kenya Airways 2019 results

Kenya Airways announced their results for 2019, which its Chairman Michael Joseph described as a reasonably good year in which they opened new routes, improved on performance and flew a record number of passengers, but one in which they had to make new accounting standard adjustments and then end by looking ahead to a Coronavirus world.   

Group CFO Hellen Mwariri read the financial results starting with an explanation of IAS17 that was replaced by IFRS16. In 2019, the airline had shown improved revenue of Kshs 128 billion which was a 12% increase from the Kshs 114 billion the year before. They had flown 5.1 million passengers, a 7% increase and opened new routes to Genera and Rome with connections to Malindi.

The revenue growth of Kshs 14 billion was offset by increased direct costs from more flights of Kshs 5.8 billion, increased fleet ownership costs with the return of two Boeing 787s that were previously-leased out, resulting in a Kshs 6.4 billion expense, and increased finance costs which went up by Kshs 4.9 billion.

The main difference with the new accounting standard was that leases which were not on the balance sheet, are now included, with interest as an expense and this would affect airlines heavy on leasing. She said that mainly as a result of the 76% increase in finance costs, the airline’s loss for the year also increased by 71%, going up from Kshs 7.5 billion in 2018 to Kshs 12.9 billion in 2019. 

Much like former CEO Mbuvi Ngunze, the airline’s new Group CEO Allan Kilavuka, who recently took over from Sebastian Mikosz, was welcomed with an in-tray of increased losses and new challenges, this time brought about by Coronavirus. 

He estimated the impact of Coronavirus was a revenue loss of revenue, to date, of $150 million (~Kshs 16 billion) and that even if they start flying in June, he estimated that revenue will be $400 million (Kshs 43 billion) lower than 2019.

He said the airline was tentatively preparing to resume flights on June 8 2020. For now, they have converted three Boeing 787’s for cargo and have daily flights carrying flowers (1,200 tons to Europe so far), food (2,600 tons to Europe & the Middle East) and medical equipment (1,500 tons), while occasionally also operating occasional passenger repatriation flights.

The losses sent the airline back into negative equity territory, but the Chairman spoke of light at the end of their restructuring, which was through the planned creation of an airline holding company, that would include the Kenya Airports Authority and probably a re-nationalised Kenya Airways. A bill is with the Attorney General and should go to Parliament in a matter of weeks. Parliament has, in essence, revived an earlier plan to enable the airline to compete with its regional peers that are all state-owned. 

Scangroup plans online EGM

WPP Scangroup will hold a unique extraordinary general meeting to obtain shareholder approval to complete the sale of one of its subsidiaries. 

The deal comprises the sale of its Kantar business, which includes 80% of Research & Marketing Group Investments, 100% of Millward Brown East Africa and its shareholding (through Scangroup Mauritius) in Millward Brown Nigeria and Millward Brown West Africa (with interests in Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Senegal and the United Kingdom). The buyer is Kantar Square Two, which is owned by Bain Capital.

Earlier this month Kenya’s Capital Markets Authority (CMA) authorized listed firms to publish their results online, pay out dividends and appoint auditors without summoning shareholders – and have these decisions ratified the next time that shareholders meet at an annual general meeting. 

However, a listed company is still required to obtain shareholder approval before selling shares in a subsidiary that results in it ceasing to be a part of the company. WPP Scangroup’s CEO Bharat Thakar then sought court approval to hold a virtual meeting of shareholders to conclude the deal.

The Court ruled that Scangroup could go ahead as long as the CMA’s rules on adequately sharing information with shareholders, processing their feedback, questions and voting are facilitated, understand and observed.

This is a first-of-its-kind session but expect more companies to try this as May and June are when most annual general meeting’s (AGM) are held.

EGM Details: Registration is now open, for shareholders to be able to vote at the May 27 extraordinary general meeting (EGM) of Scangroup by sending in their proxies, up through May 25. Shareholders are to register using their phones, and after verification, they will get access to transaction documents. They can email or send in questions, for clarification, that Scangroup will compile and share its responses with all shareholders before the May 27 meeting which shareholders will watch via a live stream. Results of the shareholder vote will be published within 24 hours.

Deal Size: The amount due to be paid to WPP Scangroup is $49.7 million, plus a $3.3 million share of the 2019 profit, that will result in a total deal amount valued at about $53.1 million (~Ksh 5.7 billion). 

Shareholder Bonus: It is expected that about 40% of the Kantar sale gains will come back to shareholders in the form of a special dividend.

Impact of the Deal: The sale will result in a one-off gain for WPP Scangroup in 2020 and a reduction of revenue from 2021. The discontinued operations accounted for Kshs 3.3 billion (26%) of Scangroup’s Kshs 12.5 billion revenue as well as 65% of its Kshs 835 million pre-tax profit in 2019. The deal will also remove Kshs 4.1 billion of assets, held for sale at the end of 2019, from Scangroup’s balance sheet going forward.

Deal Background: From 2018, WPP sought a buyer for Kantar through Goldman Sachs, Ardea Partners, Lazard Freres and Bank of America/Merrill Lynch. This resulted in bids from four private equity firms, and in July 2019, WPP agreed to sell 60% of Kantar to Bain Capital. WPP, which had an option to buy the business, will instead remain a 40% shareholder in, and do business with, Kantar. 

Deadlines: The valuation was arrived at before the global extent of the coronavirus outbreak was known, and the November 2019 deal has a long stop date of June 30, 2020

Deal Advisors: Anjarwalla & Khanna (legal) and Dyer & Blair Investment Bank (valuation). Three independent, non-executive, directors of Scangroup, Patricia Ithau, Richard Omwela and Pratul Shah, oversaw the transaction details on behalf of shareholders. 

Edits: (May 29)

  • Final Results of the vote, that had been audited by PwC were published on the Scangroup website early on Friday May 29. They showed that 88% of the registered owners had participated and had voted 99.98% in favor of the Kantar deal.
  • Here is a video stream of the EGM
  • Here are the questions posed by shareholders ahead of the meeting and responses from Scangroup.

$1 = Kshs 107.

Safaricom 2020 results with CEO transition

Safaricom PLC announced its financial results at a unique event, streamed online, that featured its incoming and outgoing CEO’s.

Overall revenue grew 5% to Kshs 251 billion as M-Pesa revenue grew 12% to Kshs 84 billion with mobile data growing 12% to Kshs 40 billion. Voice and SMS revenue declined. Profit before tax increased to Kshs 105.77 billion up 17% from the previous year, and the company will pay out Kshs 56 billion as dividends to shareholders, up from 50 billion in 2019.

The firm’s Chairman Nicholas Ng’angá welcomed the new CEO Peter Ndegwa who has been in office for a few weeks now and thanked Michael Joseph who had been appointed interim CEO following the demise of Bob Collymore in July 2019.

Ng’angá asked that the country’s regulatory period, after Coronavirus, be designed to support the revival of businesses, not one that increases taxes for consumers and businesses, noting that the company had paid Kshs 111 billion in taxes and fees to the government during 2019.

Michael Joseph said that in his second stint as CEO they had simplified offers to customers and mobile data had double-digit growth while gaining market and increasing data revenue. Safaricom and Vodacom have acquired the M-Pesa brand from Vodafone and will roll out M-Pesa across Africa with new products and lower costs. Safaricom is also pursuing one of the new licenses in Ethiopia.

Sateesh Kamath, the Chief Financial Officer, said the results were adjusted for the one off-gain of acquiring M-Pesa and that service revenue still grew in the year, despite the decline of the sports betting and the reduction of tariffs the company had undertaken to support consumers during Coronavirus. He said that they plan to introduce more use cases to cannibalise M-Pesa “withdrawal” revenue and instead grow customer e-balances in the long run, while Joseph said that they plan to roll out a unit-trust investment product.

Peter Ndegwa, the incoming CEO, announced that the company would roll out a device financing offer to enable Kenyans to access 4G smartphones, with affordable data, by paying as little as Kshs 20 per day. He concluded by saying that Coronavirus made it impossible for the company to provide forward guidance on earnings and capital expenditure for 2021 and that they would do that at a later date.

Aviation in Africa after Corona

The future of aviation in Africa after Coronavirus was the subject of a webinar by Invest Africa held this week with aviation experts. It came on the day that Air Mauritius entered into voluntary receivership, and this was said to be the first of many that will follow.

The call, which was said to be one of the most popular by Invest Africa, featured Rodger Foster (CEO at Airline SA), James Hogan, (former CEO at Etihad), Nick van de Meer (COO at Vista Global), Tony Payne, Yvonne Makolo (CEO at RwandAir) and Allan Kilavuka (MD at Kenya Airways).

Some excerpts:

  • The whole industry in lockdown and we have never seen global aviation stop, just cargo and emergencies. Airlines, can’t use 9/11 and SARS as an indication, but 9/11 resulted in 40% of business loss which took almost 5 years to recover from.
  • 40% of the global commercial aircraft grounded may not fly ever again. When SAA resumes after Coronavirus, it may only operate at 3% of its previous capacity flying 5 routes with 3 planes, down from 3,000 flights and 55 routes. 
  • Rethink business models: Rethink networks, rationalize flees, and operate small capacity aircraft. When travel resumes it’s unlikely that will require large aircraft. There may be just 3-4 business class passengers on some routes and while people may increase travel over 12-24 months, the global shutdown has made them realize that virtual meetings work, and there is less need to travel
  • There’s too much capacity and, with 200 airlines, too many players in Africa aviation. It will be survival of the fittest.
  • Airlines usually have 2 months of cash on hand, but with no planes in the sky, they are engaging in cash conservation in the short-run and finding alternative fundraising to be sustainable in the long run.  
  • While airlines are in discussions with their governments, countries have other many priorities now, like health and hospitals, and there will be no more free money from governments for airlines.  
  • Instead, airlines need to work with each other – airlines, airport, MRO, manufacturers etc. Airlines don’t have the balance sheets that airports do and consolidation will be essential because of reduced demand across the board and excess capacity.  
  • What makes a bankable airline for investors? Airlines all have the same overheads – and it is not necessary every airline to duplicate these. A 5-star hotel operates 5 restaurants using one kitchen. African airlines should restructure and have one centre of excellence for MRO (maintenance, repair, and operations), pilot training, finances, back-office structures. 
  • The productivity of staff and assets need to improve significantly – use fewer resources to do more work – but airlines have to balance that with an even smaller and health-conscious travelling public (crew and passengers) and extra costs of cleaning aircraft that are unbearable. Alongside that, skills are abundant as Covid has placed pilots and engineers on furlough and retrenchment.
  • But the challenge with cooperation and consolidation are different laws, regulation, politics, and bilateral agreements in every country.

Listen to the aviation webinar here