Barclays Kenya 2016 Financial Results

Today, Barclays became the first Kenyan bank to release its financial results for the year 2016, which was a tumultuous year for the Kenya banking sector.

New bank chairman Charles Muchene said the year saw challenges with new business models, interest rate caps and the announcement of the parent sale. He also praised his predecessor, F. Okello.

Thereafter CEO Jeremy Awori said that while Kenya’s economy looked stable with an enviable economic growth rate, a stable currency and moderate inflation, the dip in shares at the Nairobi Securities Exchange and profit warnings issued by various companies showed some the struggles that companies, including their customers, were going through. He added that challenges at some banks had resulted in increased regulatory scrutiny and audits on systems, anti-money-laundering, and insider lending all other banks, and Barclays had passed. Also, that  2018 will bring new rules on impairment (bad loans) and capital requirements.

They had the investment in technology by going paperless and customer focused channels including intelligent ATM’s that allow 24-hour cash deposits, as well as enhancing internet and mobile banking. They have also invested in alternative channels and were the first international bank to embrace agent banking in a deal they signed with Posta Kenya under which they would have post offices in far-off places (like Wajir) act as customer interaction points for the bank.

Bank branches handled 43% of transactions in 2016, which was down from 59% as other channels recorded increases with ATM;’s handling 34%, digital 14%, and POS 9%

Summing up the financial results for the year, Barclays assets grew by 8% to Kshs 260 billion, deposits went up 8% to Kshs 178 billion while loans went up 16% to Kshs 169 billion. Interestingly 68% of bank deposits don’t earn interest (they are in transactional accounts). Also, the loans increases were mostly in the first half of the year while those after the interest rate cap law (passed in September 2016)  were mostly existing customers topping up their loans.

Income went up 8% to Kshs 31.7 billion as expenses also went up 8% to Kshs 16.9 billion. But there was a huge jump in provision got bad loans, which more than doubled, to Kshs 3.9 billion and this resulted in pre-tax profit dipping from Kshs 12 billion to Kshs 10.8 billion. 90% of the impairments were from retail/ personal lending.

The dividend for the year will be Kshs 1 per share – comprising an interim dividend of 0.2 per share and a final dividend od 0.8 per share – unchanged from 2015. The payout will be a total of Kshs 5.43 billion (~$54 million)

Going forward, digital and automation will be key drivers to give customers better and efficient experiences. Barclays also plans launch new mobile banking products soon, and to become a financial technology partner to their customers, not just a bank.

Kenyan Remittance from Europe .. as Facebook launches Money Transfers

TransferWise had just launched international money transfers via Facebook messenger chat.

Methods Kenyans use to remit money from Europe

  • TransferWise’s chatbot enables customers to send money to friends and family to and from the United States, Britain, Canada, Australia and Europe from Facebook Messenger.
  • Facebook already allows its users to send money domestically in the United States via its Messenger app, but has not yet launched similar services internationally. TransferWise said its service will be the first to enable international money transfers entirely within Messenger. 
  • One of Europe’s most well-known fintech companies, TransferWise was launched in 2011 by Estonian friends Taavet Hinrikus and Kristo Käärmann out of frustration with the high fees they were being charged by banks for international money transfers.

We did a survey a few weeks ago to see how a handful of Kenyans in Europe send money to Kenya, and asked them to give reasons why they use a particular method.  W hat’s interesting is how rare banks are in the person to person transfer space. We want to expand this further and see how Kenyans in other (European and non-European) countries remit funds.  This was almost Kshs 368 billion (~$3.7 billion of receivables from the rest of the world) in 2015 according  to the Kenya Economic Survey 2016.

 

 

Plane Moments: Mostly KQ

 

  • Precision Air:  Kenya Airways and it’s associate company, Precison Air Services are working on a commercial alignment with respect to pricing on joint venture routes. They have applied to Kenya’s Competition Authority for an exemption as the regulator does not allow two similar airlines to have the same ticket pricing. Read more on Precision Air in which Kenya Airways has a 41% shareholding.
  • Kenya Gets Protectionist:  Kenya is limiting the issuing of new licences for global airlines seeking to exploit the strategic Nairobi hub in a protectionist move aimed at reviving the dwindling fortunes of national carrier Kenya Airways. Transport Ministry Principal Secretary Irungu Nyakera said Kenya is doing what the US and the European Union are doing, limiting the frequency of Middle East carriers because they have realised they are killing their own airlines, leading to job losses.  
  • Tanzania is revamping its national carrier by buying new planes as part of plans to boost tourism and transport sectors.  The country received delivery of two Bombardier Q400 planes in September at a cost of $62 million and has also made initial payment for the purchase of a Boeing 787 Dreamliner, which is expected to be delivered on June 18.
  • Nigeria airline takeovers: The takeover of the nation’s biggest airlines, Arik and Aero airlines by the undertaker, the Asset Management Corporation of Nigeria (AMCON) may have exposed some management lapses in the private sector.. some of Arik’s missteps to include “starting off its international services with the gas guzzling ultra long-range Airbus A340-500s literally guaranteeing losses on its relatively short-range services to London, South Africa, New York and Dubai. It also bought 10 of the relatively cost inefficient Boeing 737-700s used mostly by short-haul, low-cost airlines like Southwest Airlines. It only has four of the more efficient and versatile Boeing 737-800s suitable for high-capacity routes such as Lagos to Abuja and Lagos to Port Harcourt, as well as regional routes to West and Central Africa.”
  • RwandAir will start direct flights to India’s commercial centre Mumbai on April 3…it also plans to start flights to Gatwick, London’s second-busiest airport, and to the US this year as part of its strategy to serve more global markets.
  • The CEO of apologized for customer frustrations  over the last few months.  They have since introduced a new introduced a brand new Bombardier Q400 next generation aircraft to further enhance flight schedule integrity.
  • Etihad Airways Engineering has signed an agreement with Kenya Airways to perform mandatory checks on its six Boeing 787-8’s between February and October 2017.  Etihad Airways Engineering is the largest commercial aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) services provider in the Middle East.

 

Kenya Bank Rankings Part II

Bank rankings, following part I

September 2016 numbers used

11 Citibank

12 National

13 Baroda

14 Family

15 Housing Finance

16 Prime

17 Bank of Africa

18 Ecobank

19 India

20 Guaranty Trust (GT)

21 Gulf African

22 Victoria

23 ABC

24 Sidian Bank (formerly K-Rep)

25 Jamii Bora

26 Habib AG Zurich

27 Development Bank of Kenya

28 Giro *

29 Guardian

30 First Community

31 Spire (formerly Equatorial)

32 Consolidated Bank

33 Credit Bank

34 Habib Bank

35 Transnational

36 Bank M (formerly Oriental)

37 Paramount

38 UBA

39 Middle East
Missing from the bank rankings list

  • Chase Bank (in receivership)
  • Imperial Bank (in receivership)
  • Fidelity Bank *
  • Dubai Bank (in liquidation)

* exiting in 2017

I&M Bank Rwanda IPO Launched

Yesterday, I&M Bank Rwanda launched an IPO share sale that will result in the listing of the bank’s entire share capital at the Rwanda Stock Exchange. The Government of Rwanda will sell its entire 19.81% in the bank as part of its divestment from public enterprise policy, and through the sale of 90 million shares of the bank, they hope to raise 8.9 billion francs (~$10.8 million), which will go to the Rwanda government after deducting expenses.

Quick Notes

  • Minimum is 1,000 shares at RWF 90 per share, therefore the cost of investment is RWF 90,000 (~approx $109 or Kshs 11,350). Further purchases are in blocks of 100 shares.
  • Opens 14 February, closes 3 March 2017.
  • Allotment plan: 40% of the shares are reserved for international investors and 60% for domestic investors. The domestic pool is further broken down with 25% reserved for East African nationals, 5% for employees of the bank, 15% for Rwanda institutional investors (QII’s) and 15% for other East African QII’s.
  • The Plan is to list and trade the shares, in Kigali, as ‘IMR’ from 31 March 2017.

IN 2015, I&M Bank Rwanda (IMR) was the 3rd largest bank in Rwanda by assets (RWF 171 billion), behind Bank of Kigali (RWF 561 billion), and Cogebanque (RWF 178 billion). Other banks were KCB Rwanda (RWF 149 billion) and Equity Rwanda (RWF 93 billion). For 2016, IMR had assets of 206 billion francs in 2016, loans of 111 billion and deposits of 134 billion and a pretax profit of 8.4 billion francs. It’ has 17 branches, and plans to build a new headquarters ($25M) and install a new IT system ($4M). It’s business is in four mains sectors – construction, wholesale & retail, manufacturing, and agriculture.

I&M Bank Rwanda (formerly Banque Commerciale du Rwanda Limited – BCR) is the Rwanda subsidiary of I&M Holdings Limited. I&M Holdings listed on the Nairobi Securities exchange in June 2013. It is the oldest financial institution with over 50 years of existence and the first bank in Rwanda, having been incorporated in 1963Actis recapitalized the bank and became an 80% owner in 2004 and sold that 80% stake in 2012 to I&M (55%) and the governments of Germany and France who, through their development finance institutions of DEG and Proparco respectively, each retain 12.5%.

Odd points

  • IMR has entered three snap transaction with the National Bank of Rwanda regulator) in which I&M has given $8 million to the regulator in exchange for local currency. I&M will receive 2% interest and pay the NBR 8% interest in local currency.
  •  In Rwanda, bank directors sign conflict of interest statements?!

More details in the prospectus from Dyer & Blair Investment Bank, who, along with BARAKA Capital Limited Uganda, are Lead Transaction Advisors. BARAKA Capital Rwanda is the Lead Sponsoring Broker.

1 KES = 7.93 RWF and 1 USD = 823 RWF