Category Archives: Ghana

Energy and Climate to feature at AfDB talks in Accra

The annual meetings of the African Development Bank Group (AfDB) are now scheduled to take place in Accra in May 2022. Ghana’s capital has previously been expected to host the meetings last year in a physical setting, but with covid-19 still disrupting continental travel, the meetings were held virtually, for the second year in a row.

While these are is the first-in-person annual meetings since Malabo in 2019, they will be held in a hybrid format with governors representing 54 African countries and 27 other nations who oversee the African Development Bank and the African Development Fund (ADF) meeting at the Accra International Conference Centre while other participants will join in virtually. Attendees will also celebrate the 50th anniversary of the ADF.

The 2022 annual meetings will be hosted by the outgoing Chairperson of the Board of Governors, Ken Ofori-Atta, Ghana’s Minister for Finance and the theme of the annual meetings is Achieving Climate Resilience and a Just Energy Transition for Africa. This is at a time when in South Africa, homes, highways, bridges have been damaged or swept away by floods and nearly 400 have died in what President Cyril Ramaphosa said was “a disaster of catastrophic proportions” while in Eastern Africa, the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) has warned that rains will fail for the fourth consecutive year.

 In terms of climate finance, the AfDB will support transitions to non-coal and non-nuclear projects including hydro-generation, geothermal, gas, wind, and solar – and countries will be invited to put forward bankable projects for financing to be arranged. However, with the continent still energy-starved, countries that want to pursue coal as part of their energy-mix plans, can do so but with financing from other sources. 

The meetings will have knowledge events to promote discussion of policy and development of the continent. Some will be on building digital economies,  green jobs for youth & women in post-covid Africa and supporting resilience in agri-food systems with a focus on rural economies.

Ghana connects to America with a Museum

A world-class museum will be built in Ghana to grow connections with African-Americans seeking to better understand their heritage. This came after Ghana’s President Nana Akufo-Addo attended a signing ceremony between the W. E. B. Du Bois Museum Foundation and the Government of Ghana, in New York this week.

Dr. William Edward Du Bois, an author and civil rights pioneer was a friend of Ghana’s first President Kwame Nkrumah. He moved to Accra, where he is buried, and a memorial centre was opened in 1985. The museum trustees have decided to expand the site into a complex or living museum for scholars that will be designed by Ghanaian architect Sir David Adjaye. It will contain a museum, library with Du Bois’ writings and collections spanning 50 years, an auditorium, and guest house while the bungalow where Du Bois lived will be refurnished. The goal is to make Ghana the hub of pan-African research and heritage tourism

Ghana has a special connection with African-Americans who seek ways to reintegrate with or reconnect with Africa, the continent from which their ancestors descended.  12% of visitors to Ghana were from the USA and the country aims to be the preferred West African designation for North America, through heritage tours, and “back to Africa” promotions. .

Ghana dubbed 2019 the “year of return” to mark the 400th anniversary of slaves arriving in the USA. The theme of the campaign has now extended to “beyond the year of return” to encourage people in the diaspora to come and live or invest in Africa. 

AfDB 2020 annual meetings

The abbreviated annual meetings of the African Development Bank (AfDB) Group ended this week after just three days, a slimmed-down virtual event, compared to the meetings last year in Malabo.

The Governors of the bank, representing 54 African and 27 non-regional member countries, dealt with statutory matters and approved the accounts of the bank for 2019, and reviewed its performance and the auditor reports. The Governors also commended the bank for its measures to work through COVID and while also providing flexible support to countries through the COVID-19 Rapid Response Facility of up to $10 billion.

During the year there will be a focus on infrastructure finance and quality health care and collaboration with the African Union and regional economic blocs to fast-track the African Continental Free Trade Area which was postponed from July this year, and will now kick off on January 1, 2021. Another initiative that will be supported will be the G-20 debt relief effort, recognizing that many African countries will go in to recession for the first time in twenty-five years as they tackle lockdowns, weaker tax revenue, and increased emergency health expenses.

2020 Annual Meetings Day 2 – Best of

The main highlight of the AfDB meetings was the election of the President, which saw Dr. Akinwumi Adesina re-elected for a second term with 100% of the delegate votes. The USA appears to have been the main opponent of his re-election, and their comments calling for the bank to ensure cost-effective management, review its use of resources and strengthen oversight & governance were contained in the final communiqué released by the Bank at the end of the meetings.

The next AfDB Annual Meetings are planned to take place in May 2021 in Accra Ghana. They will be hosted by the new Chairperson of the Bank, Mr Ken Ofori-Atta, Ghana’s Minister for Finance who took over from Ms Niale Kaba, the Côte d’Ivoire Minister of Planning & Development after she stepped down at the end of her term this week.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/afdbgroup/50294214242/

EDIT September 1: Dr. Akinwumi Adesina was sworn in to start his second term as President of the African Development Bank Group.

Ghana bank reforms continue

Continuing banks reforms in Ghana, from back in 2018, the Bank of Ghana issued a new statement (PDF) on the state of banking in the country for the end of that year.

It stated that they had inherited a system with distressed banks that were not adequately capitalized, and which had high non-performing loans, and cases of insolvency and illiquidity – largely a result of poor corporate governance, false financial reporting, and insider dealings.

They noted that they had revoked seven licenses and arranged for those banks to exit in an orderly way and that after a recapitalization push, there were 23 banks with universal banking licenses in Ghana that had met the minimum paid-up capital of GHF 400 million (~$83 million) at the end of the year.

Excerpts:

  • The Bank of Ghana had approved three merger applications – (i) of First Atlantic Merchant and Energy Commercial banks, (ii) of Omni and Sahel Sahara banks and that of (iii) First National and GHL banks, as pension funds had invested equity in five other banks through a special purpose holding company called the Ghana Amalgamated Trust (GAT).
  • Another bank, GN Bank, was unable to comply with the capital requirement and its request to downgrade, from a universal banking license, to a savings and one had been approved. 
  • The Bank of Baroda has divested from Ghana following a decision by its parent bank which is wholly-owned by the Government of India. Subsequently, the Bank of Ghana has approved its winding down plan and allowed all the customers, assets and loans of Baroda Ghana to be migrated to Stanbic Bank Ghana.
  • Two other banks Premium and Heritage had their licenses revoked, and a receiver manager from PricewaterhouseCoopers appointed to take charge of the banks. Premium was found to have been insolvent while Heritage had obtained its license in 2016 on the basis of capital with questionable sources. All deposits of the banks were transferred to Consolidated Bank and the Ghana government has issued a bond to support the transfer of assets.

EDIT August 16 2019: The Bank of Ghana revoked the licenses of 23 insolvent savings and loans companies and finance house companies as well as 2 non-bank financial institutions.

The regulators had assessed the savings and loan and finance house sub-sectors and found challenges of low capital, excessive risk-taking, use of depositor funds for personal projects, weak corporate governance, creative accounting and persistent regularity branches and non-compliance.

The institutions are Accent Financial, Adom S&L, Alltime Finance, Alpha Capital S&L, ASN, CDH, Commerz S&L, Crest Finance, Dream Finance, Express S&L, First Allied, First African, First Ghana S&L, FirstTrust, Global Access, GN S&L, Ideal Finance, IFC, Legacy Capital, Midland, Sterling Financial, Unicredit Ghana and the Women’s World Banking Ghana S&L .

Idea Exchange: Bloomberg and Reuters financial journalism training

Bloomberg: The Bloomberg Media Initiative Africa Financial Journalism Training program has resumed. After four years of training financial journalists in Kenya, South Africa and Nigeria, the BMIA now moves on to Ghana, Zambia, Tanzania, Cote d’Ivoire and Senegal.

In the first part of the new phase, participating universities are the Ghana Institute of Journalism and University of Ghana Business School in Ghana, and the University of Zambia and University of Lusaka School of Business in Zambia. That does not mean journalists from other countries are excluded, but they have to travel to physically attend classes at the local universities,  that run from January 2019 to June 2019, for two weeks in each month.

AMIB50 chart by Bloomberg

The program is worth about $22,000 and is greatly subsidized by Bloomberg Philanthropies and the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, with the students not expected to pay more than $250. Students must also have a laptop computer and commit to attending all the classes. For the duration of the class, they also get prized access to the Blomberg terminal, an invaluable information resource for researching global financial markets. The deadline for applications is November 30. 

Reuters: The Reuters Journalism Training Programme – EMEA targets early journalists, with not more than three years experience, to undertake a nine-month training program, that includes with one month in London, and on the job training in bureaus in Africa, Europe and the Middle East.

Applicants must have an interest in issues that affect companies, markets and economies and there seems to a preference for journalists with experience in areas like banking, financial analysis, accounting, law or computer science. The deadline for applications is November 30.