Category Archives: NSE bonds

Bond Moment: M-Akiba, EABL and other NSE Bonds

Update on NSE Bonds or bonds listed at the Nairobi Securities Exchanges and other bonds, since the last bond moment in May 2015 http://bankelele.co.ke/2015/05/bond-moment-may-2015.html.

Globally, the bond market is bigger than equities one, and according to the latest CMA Kenya quarterly statistics (PDF),  bond market turnover in Kenya has been larger than the equities one since 2009 mainly due to government bonds. In 2016, equity market turnover was Kshs 147 billion (down from 209 billion) in 2015. Bond market turnover was Kshs 433 billion (~$4.2 billion) in 2016 (up from 305 billion in 2015). Turnover has been 99% due to government treasury bonds, while that of corporates is less than 1% of bond turnover in a year – except in the years 2010 and 2011.

If one doesn’t want to buy NSE bonds directly, there are CMA-approved bond funds for investors including the Apollo Bond Fund, Co-op Bond Fund, Diaspora Bond Fund, Dyer & Blair Bond Fund, ICEA Bond Fund, Madison Asset Bond Fund, and the Old Mutual Bond Fund. These fixed income /bond funds total Kshs 1.4 billion (or 2.5% of the 57 billion) of funds management by fund managers in Kenya.

Government Bonds

  • M-Akiba: Following the successful launch of M-Akiba, Kenya’s Kshs 150 million , 10%, tax-free, 3 year bonds that were entirely sold via mobile phone (the minimum investment was Kshs 3,000 (~$30))  another Kshs 4.85 billion (~$47 million) is to be floated in June 2017.
  • Following the launch of a green bonds program, banks, under the ambit of the Kenya Bankers Association (KBA), have partnered with Nairobi Securities Exchange (NSE) towards raising the country’s first bank-supported climate change-aligned corporate debt instruments in the next six to eight months. The capital flows from the green bonds in Kenya will go towards funding bank clients that require finance for clean and sustainable development projects in the priority areas of energy, agriculture, transport, infrastructure, building and urban planning, and water and waste management…so far, banks operating in South Africa and Morocco are already tapping the green finance opportunities in partnership with local municipalities and development finance institutions. projects. Also in South Africa, the World Bank’s International Finance Corp (IFC) successfully raised a 9-year, 1 billion Rand Green Bond via the Johannesburg Stock Exchange. More on the Kenya Bankers Association Sustainable Finance Initiative.
  • The Kenya Government finance bill 2017 will give Islamic finance bonds the same treatment as conventional bonds and also allow Islamic finance products in the cooperatives sub-sector.
  • The Rwanda government is about to issue a 10 billion Rwanda franc (~$12 million), 7-year Treasury bond. It will be issued on May 24 and the funds will be used for infrastructure project and capital markets development. The bonds will be listed at the Rwanda stock exchange and trade in multiple of 100,000 francs (~$120).
  • Nigeria has asked Goldman Sachs & Stanbic IBTC Bank to advise it on the sale of a debut “diaspora bond” targeted at Nigerians living abroad. – via @kenyanwalstreet

Corporate NSE Bonds:

  • Centum announced a Kshs 2 billion one year 14.5% note for the Two Rivers Development.
  • Cytonn is seeking advisors  for their medium term notes to raise Kshs 5 billion from the public towards the financing of Cytonn real estate’s (CRE) projects including Taraji Heights in Ruaka and The Ridge in Ridgeways.
  • On Monday EABL listed the Kshs 6 billion (~$58 million) of bonds at the Nairobi Securities Exchange (NSE) as the second and final tranche of its Kshs 11 billion shilling medium term note program that was launched in 2015. The tranche attracted bids worth Kshs 8.4 billion, representing a 41% over-subscription. The bonds maturing in March 2022 will pay an annual fixed interest of at least 14.17% and the raised funds will go towards optimising operations and restructuring the brewer’s balance sheet. “This is the first corporate bond to be listed on the bourse this year, and we are confident that its success, a subscription rate of 140.9% will open the doors for more listings in the course of this year.” said Nairobi Securities Exchange CEO Mr. Geoffrey Odundo. Citi upgraded EABL as a buy, due to its low price – seeing value even as the beer market was flat. The first half of FY17 (ended December 2016) showed decent volume growth for EABL (+5% YOY) but weak sales growth (-6%) as beer demand continued to shift from mainstream to value. EABL is doing well in spirits but struggling in beer, and Tanzania continues to present a challenge. – Citi report.
  • A South African credit-only micro-finance institution Real People Investment Holdings which issued a multi-billion bond in Kenya late 2015, has received a negative rating. Global Credit Ratings (GCR) said it had downgraded the primary and special servicer quality ratings assigned, with the outlook accorded as negative.
  • Transcentury bond holders lost 50% in a restructuring buyout deal.

Other Bonds

  • The African Development Bank had led the establishment of an African Domestic Bond Index and a $200 million African Domestic Bond Fund to deepen liquidity in local bond markets. It has also issued local currency bonds in 11 countries, including Kenya, South Africa, Egypt, Ghana, Nigeria, Botswana, and Uganda. leading the African Union in mobilizing domestic resources required to execute the Bank’s five developmental priorities dubbed the ‘High 5s’. – Light up and power Africa, Feed Africa, Industrialize Africa, Integrate Africa and Improve the quality of life for the people of Africa.
  • The Africa Finance Corporation issued a US$500 million 7 year Eurobond. The senior, unsecured Eurobond which carries a coupon of 3.875% was priced to yield 4.000% and matures in April 2024. It attracted orders of US$2.4 billion, representing about 5 times over-subscription from 231 investors. The bond will be listed on the Irish Stock Exchange. The Eurobond was distributed to investors in Europe (29%), United States (25%), United Kingdom (24%), Asia (18%) and the Middle East (4%). Citi, J.P. Morgan, MUFG and Standard Chartered Bank acted as Joint Lead Managers and Bookrunners for the U.S. dollar-denominated issue.
  • FSD Africa (Financial Sector Deepening Africa) and KfW Development Bank will invest £15.3 million (~$19.8 million or Kshs 2 billion) in the African Local Currency Bond Fund enabling it to step up its engagement with developmentally important industry sectors such as green energy and housing and take on investments in fragile and conflict-affected states. ALCBF is managed by Lion’s Head Global Partners (LHGP) Asset Management LLP.
  • Bonds, Loans & Sukuk Africa “the continent’s only Pan-African debt event” takes place on 13th & 14th March 2018, at the Cape Town International Convention Centre.

Kenya Green Bonds Launched

A few days ago saw the launch of green bonds in Kenya with the signing of a memorandum of understanding between the Kenya Bankers Association, Nairobi Securities Exchange (NSE) and Financial Sector Deepening Africa (not FSD Kenya). Through this, they hope to deliver lower cost funds through capital markets to finance green projects. China is actually the leader in this along with India, but Kenya, as part of a climate bonds initiative, will be the flagship for green bonds in Africa.

NSE CEO Geoffery Odundo NSE Odundo said green bond listings at the NSE would attract impact investors while Kenya Bankers Chairman, Lamin Manjang said they hoped the first green bond would list at the NSE this year. FSD Africa has committed $600,000 to this and the IFC will partner with KBA to determine green portfolio i.e. projects that quality for such finance, from sectors such as energy, agriculture, infrastructure, transport, manufacturing. Other actives to be undertaken include and enabling small banks to take part in financing the pipeline, extending green bonds across East Africa, creating a pool of Kenya green finance experts, and promoting green Islamic finance.

More on renewable energy project finance in Kenya.

Two Rivers Development Bond

Peek at the Two Rivers bond prospectus

This week Centum investments announced a Kshs 2 billion one year 14.5% note for the Two Rivers Development Limited – which is 58% owned by Centum, 39% by Avic, and 3% by ICDC.

Two Rivers had a facility of Chase Bank to finance infrastructure developments, which they had drawn on partially when the bank closed. They also had Kshs 650 million of deposits at Chase.

Two Rivers owns 50% of Two Rivers Lifestyle Centre and 100% of phase two of Two Rivers, apartments, and offices. 50% of the mall, the largest in Sub-Saharan Africa (i.e. outside South Africa) which opened on Valentines’ Day was sold to Old Mutual in 2015 for Kshs 6.4 billion. Two Rivers Development was valued at Kshs 41 billion in March 2016.

To pay for the retirement of the bond, they are selling 11 plots of land (some residential, some mixed use, one for a hotel) which have a combines market value Kshs 6.6 billion, and a mortgage value of Kshs 5.6 billion. Interest will be paid at maturity, and the note is guaranteed by Centum Investments.

The Centum investor briefing (PDF) for 1Q2107 identifies education, leasing, and agribusiness as key areas of growth at Centum in the future.

$1 = Kshs 103

M-Akiba: Kenya’s new government bonds that are bought by phone

Today saw the launch of M-Akiba, a long awaited product that through which ordinary Kenyans tcan buy government bonds on their phones, using mobile money. The can purchase units as small as Kshs 3,000 (~$30) and earn 10%.

Some tweets about the events today: 

  • The Central Bank of Kenya governor (@njorogep) said  #MAkiba bond is in line with @CBKKenya strategy to increase the level of financial inclusivity in the economy – @NSEKenya   
  • #MAkiba is a collaborative initiative between @NSEKenya @KeTreasury @cdsckenya @SafaricomLtd @AIRTEL_KE @KCBGroup – @NSEKenya
  • Phase One of M-Akiba Runs for 3 weeks targeting Sh150M. Main offer targeting Sh4.85Bn in Q2-Q3 Will run for 3 Months – @kenyanwalstreet
  • M-Akiba bond has so far been Ksh. 535k purchased. I am surprised Kenyans were this interested. So far highest buy is at Ksh. 50k – @MumbiWarui
  • Day One Of M-Akiba; Bonds worth Ksh 1.0 Million Bought Via Mobile Phones In the first 60 Minutes http://kenyanwallstreet.com/m-akiba-retail-bond-goes-live … @kenyanwalstreet
  • To trade #MAkiba bond open a CDS account by dialling *889# either on @SafaricomLtd @AIRTEL_KE .The initial investment per account is 3,000. – @NSEKenya
  • CDSC to manage the register of the bond, offer IPO managements system and the depository and settlement services on behalf of the government – @cdsckenya
  • We have just witnessed the launch of the first M-Akiba bond at the Treasury. It has a coupon rate of 10%p.a.Tradable through the phone.- @JimnahMbaru
  • The #MAkiba bond entry level is kshs 3,000 compared to the current entry point of Ksh 50,000 for any govt securities. @M_AKIBA2017 – @NSEKenya
  • #MAkiba bond is a tax free bond that will attract a 10% interest paid biannually within a period of 3 years @CMAKenya @cdsckenya @CBKKenya – @M_AKIBA2017
  • We are receiving A LOT of transactions per sec. In case of any delays, please just try again. Thank you for the overwhelming response so far – @M_AKIBA2017
  •  UPDATE: Subscription figures- @AIRTEL_KE  Airtel Money -1,300 @SafaricomLtd  MPESA-420 Total collection KES 2.4 million. AS AT 4PM TODAY – @M_AKIBA2017

Some Blogs:  

EDIT

  • M-Akiba is a three year fixed coupon infrastructure “special limited offer” bond
  • Issue number MAB1/2017/3
  • Amount Kshs 150 million (~$1.5 million) issued in March 2017
  • Apply by *889#, and runs from 23 March to 7 April and will be allocated on a first come first served basis
  • Minimum investment is Kshs 3,000, maximum investment is Kshs 140,000 (~$1,400) per day
  • Coupon 10% a year
  • Bond will be listed on the NSE and will be tradable by phone from April 11
  • Trading commission is 0.1% of actual allocations
  • M-akiba interest is tax exempt
  • Pays interest every 6 months: on (2017) 9 Oct, (2018) 9 April, 8 Oct., (2019), 8 April, 7 Oct., (2020) 6 April
  • From a prospectus in a local newspaper.

Notes

‘Akiba’ means  ‘savings’  in Swahili
$1 = Ksh 103

EuroBond & Mindspeak with Henry Rotich

Last weekend, the Mindspeak series had National Treasury Cabinet Secretary Henry Rotich

Treasury Cabinet Secretary . There was a lot of expectation that he was there to talk about Eurobond but that wasn’t the case and it was merely one subject he touched on his talks about his role and functions in the government, and economic outlook for Kenya.

In his intro, host Aly-Khan Satchu said that the Kenya Eurobond which was the perfectly timed and a stunning issue at 6.875%, the largest SSA bond perfectly times. It has helped the shilling  – stunning issue outperform many currencies – only losing 11% against the dollar, compared to the Rand (-39%) , Angola (-50%) and Kwacha (-73). KCB CEO Joshua Oigara noted that people outside Kenya are more confident than people within, and people who are doing great things, should know that a certain percent will not agree with you.

CS Rotich at Mindspeak

Excerpts of the CS presentation, remarks, and Q&A session 

  • Kenya Outlook China slowdown to focus on domestic and US exit from international market will have an impact on the world, but Kenya with a diversified economy and strong private sector should be resilient
  • Challenges include to reduce poverty, and inequality, and also create employment. The economy needs to grow faster than 5-6% and not getting enough innate employment. 1 million a year. 6% will only create 600,000 jobs. so need 10% growth to create jobs 1 million per year. 
  • Agriculture has not been modernized for a long time. these services sector (ICT, financial). manufacturing has been flat for two decades (10% of GDP) – and this needs to be 20%. That’s  why they are support leather & textile, and working to lower energy costs and , improve the business environment through special economic zones.

The Job 

  • He is guided in his job by three measures of economic health – interest rates, exchange rates and inflation (stable, single digits).
  • The ministry has undertaken fiscal reforms, and the budget is more policy-based.They pay suppliers with Gpay and IFMIS, new procurement laws are in place, the auditor general reviews expenditure, and there are quarterly reports on the website and which are submitted to parliament.

Eurobond/Debts:

  • Kenya still has low and sustainable external debt levels. It did not get HIPC debt relief, unlike other countries and has paid debts on time – this was a big selling point when marketing the Eurobond.
  • The current account deficit gone from 10% to 7% of GDP mainly because of lower oil prices, and less thermal energy generation and slowdown of consumer imports  (good, as the focus should be  on investments not consumption)
  • You cannot be a growing economy if you can’t borrow from outside – you need to safeguards.  The bond was oversubscribed and when it traded favorably, they also did a tap sale that picked another $750m. Aly-Khan said the government actually got $815 million and only has to pay back $750 million.
  • Explanations and documentation about the bonds are on the treasury website.
  • Euro bond proceeds received have been spent on 2013-15 budget programs like infrastructure projects. The bond was not specific, and not earmarked to any project. it was for budgetary support of programs, some initiated by the previous government, such as roads and electrification
  • We will remain as participants in the international market and soon intend to borrow more

Savings

  • Need to raise Kenyan savings from 12% to at least 30% of GDP – perhaps through more innovative finance products (from insurers  & capital markets) to save.
  • M-akiba bond launch has been delayed. It was meant to come out last October, but interest rates were still high and volatile.
  • They have also sorted issues with Safaricom and CDSC  – all that’s left is to set the price and launch.
  • Kenyans will be able to buy government bonds of amounts of Kshs 3,000 (~$29) by phone.

Taxes:

  • Wants to raise tax to GDP ratio to 25%, but people say there are too many taxes already
  • Wants to keep government wages below 35% of revenue.
  • New VAT and excise bills have come, but we are yet to modernise income tax. That should happen by the next budget with a view to expanding tax base (very few people pay tax now).
  • They will also support county governments to implement and collect taxes assigned to them like property tax.

Local Banks

  • Wants to reduce bank interest rate spreads from 17% to 8% – we’ve been asking banks what is this 8%? Can they share infrastructure, reduce the cost of perfection securities etc.
  • There are too many banks that are not offering competition;  5 banks control 70-80% – the other 30 are competing for 30% market share. Parliament stalled a move to increase bank capital, but his aim is for 15-20 banks which actually compete.

 Oil & Petrol

  • It’s good that Kenya did not discover oil early – and was thus able to diversify and develop agriculture, and services, and its only now that oil & minerals are being discovered.
  • The petrol pump price would be lower if exchange rate was 88-90. Now the rate at 102 has eaten a lot of  savings.
  • When oil prices fall, we should  actually keep the petrol price the same and transfer the savings to a fund

Privatization

  • There has been no government privatization since Safaricom — the current law is a hindrance rather than  facilitator as there are too many lengthy requirements and safeguards. We may have to amend the law if you wants to see more privatization transactions, and need to trust the government by not requiring too many consultations.
  • There’s a pipeline of projects to sell,  starting with sugar companies, then a few banks (government owns 4 banks), hotels stakes etc.