Category Archives: CBK

M-Akiba: Kenya’s new government bonds that are bought by phone

Today saw the launch of M-Akiba, a long awaited product that through which ordinary Kenyans tcan buy government bonds on their phones, using mobile money. The can purchase units as small as Kshs 3,000 (~$30) and earn 10%.

Some tweets about the events today: 

  • The Central Bank of Kenya governor (@njorogep) said  #MAkiba bond is in line with @CBKKenya strategy to increase the level of financial inclusivity in the economy – @NSEKenya   
  • #MAkiba is a collaborative initiative between @NSEKenya @KeTreasury @cdsckenya @SafaricomLtd @AIRTEL_KE @KCBGroup – @NSEKenya
  • Phase One of M-Akiba Runs for 3 weeks targeting Sh150M. Main offer targeting Sh4.85Bn in Q2-Q3 Will run for 3 Months – @kenyanwalstreet
  • M-Akiba bond has so far been Ksh. 535k purchased. I am surprised Kenyans were this interested. So far highest buy is at Ksh. 50k – @MumbiWarui
  • Day One Of M-Akiba; Bonds worth Ksh 1.0 Million Bought Via Mobile Phones In the first 60 Minutes http://kenyanwallstreet.com/m-akiba-retail-bond-goes-live … @kenyanwalstreet
  • To trade #MAkiba bond open a CDS account by dialling *889# either on @SafaricomLtd @AIRTEL_KE .The initial investment per account is 3,000. – @NSEKenya
  • CDSC to manage the register of the bond, offer IPO managements system and the depository and settlement services on behalf of the government – @cdsckenya
  • We have just witnessed the launch of the first M-Akiba bond at the Treasury. It has a coupon rate of 10%p.a.Tradable through the phone.- @JimnahMbaru
  • The #MAkiba bond entry level is kshs 3,000 compared to the current entry point of Ksh 50,000 for any govt securities. @M_AKIBA2017 – @NSEKenya
  • #MAkiba bond is a tax free bond that will attract a 10% interest paid biannually within a period of 3 years @CMAKenya @cdsckenya @CBKKenya – @M_AKIBA2017
  • We are receiving A LOT of transactions per sec. In case of any delays, please just try again. Thank you for the overwhelming response so far – @M_AKIBA2017
  •  UPDATE: Subscription figures- @AIRTEL_KE  Airtel Money -1,300 @SafaricomLtd  MPESA-420 Total collection KES 2.4 million. AS AT 4PM TODAY – @M_AKIBA2017

Some Blogs:  

EDIT

  • M-Akiba is a three year fixed coupon infrastructure “special limited offer” bond
  • Issue number MAB1/2017/3
  • Amount Kshs 150 million (~$1.5 million) issued in March 2017
  • Apply by *889#, and runs from 23 March to 7 April and will be allocated on a first come first served basis
  • Minimum investment is Kshs 3,000, maximum investment is Kshs 140,000 (~$1,400) per day
  • Coupon 10% a year
  • Bond will be listed on the NSE and will be tradable by phone from April 11
  • Trading commission is 0.1% of actual allocations
  • M-akiba interest is tax exempt
  • Pays interest every 6 months: on (2017) 9 Oct, (2018) 9 April, 8 Oct., (2019), 8 April, 7 Oct., (2020) 6 April
  • From a prospectus in a local newspaper.

Notes

‘Akiba’ means  ‘savings’  in Swahili
$1 = Ksh 103

Diamond Trust & Habib: Bank Mergers & Musical Chairs – Part III

See Part I and Part II 

  • An unexpected piece of news today was the announcement that Diamond Trust intends to acquire Habib Bank.  Diamond Trust is Kenya’s  sixth largest bank with assets of Kshs 230 billion (September 2016), while Habib is number 34 with assets of Kshs 11 billion. The banks have a common shareholding though the Aga Khan network. EDIT: the purchase will be done by the issuance of 13.28 million shares of Diamond Trust at Kshs 137.39, valuing the deal at Kshs 1.82 billion. Other shareholders of Diamond Trust will be diluted by 4.75%.
  • A week earlier, the Central Bank of Kenya also announced that it was in the process of licensing two new banks – DIB and Mayfair. DIB Kenya is a wholly owned subsidiary of Dubai Islamic Bank, a leading sharia compliant bank from the United Arab Emirates. DIB is not associated, and won’t want to be linked to the Dubai Bank that’s currently in liquidation.  Mayfair Bank is owned by a diverse group of Kenyan investors with interests in various sectors (including politics)
  • Also, a decision on Chase Bank is expected in the next few weeks. A target had been set to restore the bank back to indecent owners by the first anniversary of it being put into receivership. A merger or buyout is likely.
  • More mergers expected with the credit squeeze on small banks?

Edit

From a Diamond Trust newspaper release

  • Habib is the largest private bank in Pakistan with 1,673 branches in 22 countries. The deal will enable DTB to establish relationships with frontier markets in Asia where Habib has operations and this is also in line with the CBK policy of consolidation in the Kenyan banking sector.
  • The lead transaction advisor for the deal was Pacifis Advisory, assisted by PWC while Anjarwalla & Khanna was the lead legal advisor.

 

Barclays Kenya 2016 Financial Results

Today, Barclays became the first Kenyan bank to release its financial results for the year 2016, which was a tumultuous year for the Kenya banking sector.

New bank chairman Charles Muchene said the year saw challenges with new business models, interest rate caps and the announcement of the parent sale. He also praised his predecessor, F. Okello.

Thereafter CEO Jeremy Awori said that while Kenya’s economy looked stable with an enviable economic growth rate, a stable currency and moderate inflation, the dip in shares at the Nairobi Securities Exchange and profit warnings issued by various companies showed some the struggles that companies, including their customers, were going through. He added that challenges at some banks had resulted in increased regulatory scrutiny and audits on systems, anti-money-laundering, and insider lending all other banks, and Barclays had passed. Also, that  2018 will bring new rules on impairment (bad loans) and capital requirements.

They had the investment in technology by going paperless and customer focused channels including intelligent ATM’s that allow 24-hour cash deposits, as well as enhancing internet and mobile banking. They have also invested in alternative channels and were the first international bank to embrace agent banking in a deal they signed with Posta Kenya under which they would have post offices in far-off places (like Wajir) act as customer interaction points for the bank.

Bank branches handled 43% of transactions in 2016, which was down from 59% as other channels recorded increases with ATM;’s handling 34%, digital 14%, and POS 9%

Summing up the financial results for the year, Barclays assets grew by 8% to Kshs 260 billion, deposits went up 8% to Kshs 178 billion while loans went up 16% to Kshs 169 billion. Interestingly 68% of bank deposits don’t earn interest (they are in transactional accounts). Also, the loans increases were mostly in the first half of the year while those after the interest rate cap law (passed in September 2016)  were mostly existing customers topping up their loans.

Income went up 8% to Kshs 31.7 billion as expenses also went up 8% to Kshs 16.9 billion. But there was a huge jump in provision got bad loans, which more than doubled, to Kshs 3.9 billion and this resulted in pre-tax profit dipping from Kshs 12 billion to Kshs 10.8 billion. 90% of the impairments were from retail/ personal lending.

The dividend for the year will be Kshs 1 per share – comprising an interim dividend of 0.2 per share and a final dividend od 0.8 per share – unchanged from 2015. The payout will be a total of Kshs 5.43 billion (~$54 million)

Going forward, digital and automation will be key drivers to give customers better and efficient experiences. Barclays also plans launch new mobile banking products soon, and to become a financial technology partner to their customers, not just a bank.

Relief for Imperial Bank Depositors – Part III

This week, depositors at the closed Imperial Bank got some welcome news with the announcement that a third payment was going to be paid to them.

This comes after a first payment last December of up to Kshs 1 million per depositor that was paid through KCB and Diamond Trust banks and another one earlier this year of up to Kshs 1.5 million that was paid out by NIC bank.

This third payment is unique in that it targets the remains depositors many of who are believed to be large depositors.  After the first payment, the CBK had expressed concern that some  depositors had not bothered to claim the funds offered. But assuming that someone has funds of ~Kshs 50 million to Kshs 100 million at the bank, they were unlikely to be elated to received 1 million in the first or second rounds.

This time depositors can access up to 10% of the deposits, so the people above would get Kshs 5 or 10 million – still small, but much better- and depositors have a month to file claims at any NIC bank branches to receive the payments  (deadline 31 Jan 2017).

The news also comes after a few days after newspaper stories that revealed the names and evidence of correspondence of CBK officials  who may have benefited inappropriately from the largesse of the management of the bank that they were supposed to have supervises.

$1= Kshs 102

 

Biggest Banking Stories of 2016

Some are carry-overs from 2015, but still having an impact on the banking sector in 2016 include:

1. The shutdown of Chase Bank in April 2016 came after a 24-hour period that started with a second set of 2014 financial accounts published in unclear circumstances in a newspaper, with different figures. Whether this was due to a reclassification of Shariah loans or (insider) director lending was never explained, but it accelerated an ongoing run of withdrawals and the Central Bank had to close the bank the next day. While it reopened a few weeks later with funding from the central bank (channeled through KCB), and depositors have been able to access some of their funds, the bank is not back to its full standing (it’s till not lending in full, and there’s a moratorium on depositors interest) and  new investors are being sought to enable the bank to stand on its own from April 2017.

2 Njomo Bill: In a rare bi-partisan move, usually reserved for their own salary raises, members of parliament rallied around to take on an even less popular target – that of super profit making, high-interest rate, banks with the Njomo bill. This was the latest attempt to rein in interest rates and the president surprisingly signed the bill, passing on a hot potato which was expected to lead to a slowdown in lending and make banks less attractive to investors.

3. Governor Patrick Njoroge at the Central Bank. Widely admired by the public for his no-nonsense enforcement & understanding of rules, supervision, austerity, and honestly to clean up the banking sector, but vilified in some circles for his unreasonable decision-making that has seen three banks close under his watch.

4. Last year Imperial Bank closure was a shock, and in 2016 the extent of the shell is still becoming clear through numerous court documents pitting the receivers, regulators, shareholders, some customers and even the family of the later managing director who engineered the fraud. But all that pained depositors want to know is, where is the money, how much money is there, and when will they get paid?

5. Lax government banking. From not following up whistleblowers on Family, Chase and Imperial, to a reluctance to act on South Sudan leaders. From double payments to government contractors, to county and national governments having dozens of banks accounts for inexplicable reasons. From a parastatal moving to a single signatory and withdrawing all its’ funds to pay a fictitious contract, and the funny banking of NYS money by Josephine Kabura at Family Bank. The anti-fraud / anti-money laundering/ anti-terror rules are  not being observed.